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ABOUT US

Marino Therapy Centre has 30 years experience successfully helping sufferers of eating disorders to fully recover and live their lives free from the Eating Distress condition.

Marino Therapy Centre was founded by Gerry and Marie Campion, author of the book Hope, and has over 30 years experiences successfully teaching people how to live life free from Eating Disorders/Eating Distress.

Marino Therapy Centre’s eating disorders treatment programme provides a comprehensive, supportive, personal and tailored experience for people who require a more structured recovery environment. The centre offers a secure environment full of understanding and empathy. A structured approach using the latest methodology and working with the person’s own model of the world is applied. Each programme is specially tailored for person’s needs.

The client undergoes an extensive evaluation to determine the severity of the problem and establish a positive treatment regime. The client enters the proper treatment setting at MTC. In each of these settings he/she will be provided with intensive psychological care and thereafter begin a programme of behaviour modification that will show how to break the dysfunction with food and weight.

Marino Therapy Centre supports the recovery from all forms of eating disorders, including anorexia, bulimia and emotional eating.

When you attend Marino Therapy Centre, you enrol as a student of life.

Education is core to our treatment. Education is from the Latin word ‘educe’ which means ‘draw out, bring out’. We aim to draw the very best out of every person we work with. The work of our MTC team is based on teaching our clients to let go of self-destructive coping mechanisms and learn to experience a Life of Freedom. Our program, based in over 30 years of specialising in Eating Distress / Disorder recovery, provides positive life-changes, cognitive and behavioural changes, emotional guidance and learning to let go of your negative, and pre-conditional thinking.

When you attend Marino Therapy Centre, you become a student of Life.

My body is an instrument not an ornament  

My body is an instrument not an ornament  

My body is an instrument not an ornament  

My body is an instrument not an ornament  

My body is an instrument not an ornament  

Today I choose Freedom over Fear  

Today I choose Freedom over Fear  

Today I choose Freedom over Fear  

Today I choose Freedom over Fear  

Today I choose Freedom over Fear  

PHILOSOPHY OF TREATMENT

Marino Therapy Centre treatment is based upon belief that Eating Distress is reaction to environment and affects the whole person, physically, emotionally and spiritually, therefore we need to adopt a holistic view of each person and address all these areas.

The practitioners of Marino Therapy Centre are all highly qualified professionals specialising in the area of Eating Distress. Due to the medical complications of this illness a GP is also attached to the centre.

The client’s family is offered to meet with the practitioner for family education sessions and learn more about the condition, explore its origin and discuss the effect it has on the family. This will help open the lines of communications between the client and the family.

The centre organises group discussions concerning topics associated with Eating Distress, including self-esteem, interpersonal relationships, communication, body awareness and nutrition. Each person is given the opportunity to develop emotionally with increasing responsibility for daily living.

What is recovery?

The first step to a successful journey to help someone recover from ED is to expand one’s knowledge of the condition. Not understanding is dangerous. Many people claim to know a lot about this disease, but often they do not understand the recovery process.

Some people put a lot of energy into finding out the reason why a person has ED. This logical thinking reasons that by rectifying the causes, a person will recover. This is in many cases waste of energy. We need to put all our energy into finding out the reasons for recovery. Recovery means learning how to deal with life’s problems in constructive ways without turning to food or starvation. Recovery involves learning how to get more out of life while learning how to balance life with other things like friendships, work, hobbies and interests. Anything that offers hope has the potential to heal. Hope is more powerful than any other therapeutic technique.

Recovery is about making better choices in life. It is important to learn not to be afraid of recovery. Instead, focus on learning how to enjoy the journey to find the real self. Recovery involves letting go of the desire to be rescued and taking responsibility to find out who we are.

Recovery means something else to every person. But in our experience, we found that nearly everybody’s recovery includes the points listed below.

Recovery is:

  • Gaining freedom from food obsession
  • Gaining freedom from body obsession
  • Learning to know yourself
  • Learning to be aware of yourself
  • Learning to accept yourself
  • Learning to believe in yourself
  • Emphasising honesty
  • Living in the present
  • Taking care of your physical health
  • Changing and being open to forming new relationships
  • Giving to others and learning to receive
  • Being able to talk about your real feelings
  • Having clarity of thought
  • Increasing spirituality
  • Gaining the ability to have real fun in life
  • Loving yourself the way you are

I will create a life I will love  

I will create a life I will love  

I will create a life I will love  

I will create a life I will love  

I will create a life I will love  

I will create a life I will love  

MEDICAL INFORMATION

Info Pack for Medical Professionals

Eating Disorders such as Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, Binge-Eating Disorder and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified, as described in the psychiatric manual DSM IV, are just labels which concentrate mostly on the description of a person’s behaviour. The different types very often overlap and even the top experts agree that it is difficult to make a clear diagnosis. But all of these are only the symptoms of the condition known as Eating Distress (ED).

Eating Distress is a condition where the mind culminates all of the negative assumptions the person has about him or herself. The negative mind becomes more powerful than the positive mind and has much more influence on the person’s thinking, feelings and behaviour. This state of mind develops subconsciously and the person is not always aware that they are victims of this self-destructive condition. Often we read that sufferers have a low self-esteem. However, in reality, he or she has no sense of self at all. Therefore, this condition is extremely abusive and manifests itself with highly destructive symptoms in which an Eating Disorder is one.

Family

The term ‘family’ describes ‘a unique cluster of people who enjoy a special relationship by reason of love, marriage, procreation, and mutual dependence.’ The family plays a primary role in how we develop as a person and how we see ourselves in relation to other people. The family acts as a ‘mini -society’ with its own governing system, politics, economics, culture and beliefs. Our experiences with how we operate in this first structure influences how we operate out in the world because the family is vital to helping to develop belief systems and values. However, this does not mean that the family is responsible for all developmental problems that may emerge in a person’s life.

There are no Typical ED Families. The presence of an ED in a family does NOT mean that the family or its members are dysfunctional! Over the years, families have been studied and re-studied to determine the causes of ED. However, there is nothing conclusive to say that dysfunctional families breed ED. Many sufferers come from loving families without trauma or upset.

There is no perfect family, parent, sibling or environment. The only conclusive absolute that links sufferers is their sensitivity. The negativity of the sufferers’ condition is similar, yet the sufferers and their families and environments are all unique and individual. Work with the family is firstly educational. The key to successful recovery is improve their knowledge of the condition.

Many family members enter treatment with shame, guilt and fear. In the practitioner’s first session with the family, it is necessary to address the fears, shame and guilt. Fear of the ED, and shame and guilt for causing it all get in the way of helping to get rid of it!! Fear usually effects boundaries and rules. Parents are afraid to set rules and/or boundaries for fear that the sufferer will react poorly. Therefore, they become too flexible or too rigid.

The most important thing to impart on carers is to help them to let go of trying to change their loved one’s behaviour. The family member needs to come to terms with understanding that they have power only over their own behaviour. Not understanding this can set the family on a dangerous course. If we only concentrate on controlling the eating behaviour, the Eating Distress gets worse. Stressing that carers need to care for themselves just as much as they do for the sufferer is a difficult concept for most family members. And, when they understand in theory, it is often difficult to put into practice.

Medical Complications Associated with Eating Distress & Eating disorders

Non-medical therapist treating ED need to be aware of the physical problems created by this illness, so that they can encourage their patients to seek medical evaluation and treatment. Two persons with the same behaviour may develop completely different symptoms. Some patients who self-induce vomiting has low electrolytes and bleeding oesophagus, others can vomit for years without ever developing these symptoms. It is necessary to have a well-trained and experienced physician as part of the treatment of an Eating Distress.

Medical assessment

  • Laboratory and other diagnostic test
  • Nutritional evaluation
  • Physical exam

Common Complaints

  • Headaches
  • Stomach-aches
  • Insomnia
  • Weakness
  • Fatigue
  • Dizzy spells

Consequences of starving (Anorexia Nervosa)

  • Dry thin hair
  • Dry skin covered with downy fuzz
  • Brittle splitting nails
  • Weak and wasted muscles
  • Tremors
  • Constipation, bloating and abdominal discomfort
  • Kidney and bladder infections
  • Urinary track stones
  • Cavities and gum disease
  • Frantic activity and depression
  • Absence of cycle
  • When the level of body fat falls bellows a certain point, the mind becomes utterly preoccupied with food.

Consequences of bingeing and vomiting (Bulimia Nervosa)

  • Menstrual irregularities
  • Puffy face, swollen gland in neck beneath jaw
  • Sore throat or sinus infections
  • Hair loss
  • Cavities and loss of tooth enamel
  • Weak muscles
  • Raw fingers from acid from vomiting/Russell’s sings

I have the power to create the life I desire.  

I have the power to create the life I desire.  

I have the power to create the life I desire.  

I have the power to create the life I desire.  

I have the power to create the life I desire.  

I have the power to create the life I desire.